Who We Help

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Thousands of people come through the doors of Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen every week for a tasty, nutritious meal that will see them through the day.

Many guests are homeless, and the time they spend here gives them a respite from life on the street, a place to relax, where they feel safe and comfortable and are part of a community.

Some guests are in a transitional situation and spend time with our counselors to help them take the first steps toward finding a permanent place to live or a way back into the workforce. Others come on their lunch break, eating quickly, so they can get back to work.

Thousands of people means thousands of different needs and different situations. But our guests have one thing in common: all are hungry.

Hunger in New York City

Volunteers are often surprised by the cross section of people they see coming for a meal. Women, men, children, all ages and ethnicities—hunger doesn’t discriminate and sadly, coping with hunger every day is a reality for many.

1.1 million people are hungry in New York City – We are the largest soup kitchen in New Jecenta and SpencerYork and serve about 1,000 meals every weekday.

Just about 1 in 5 children live in food insecure homes – 
Families make up three-quarters of the homeless shelter population

Many of our guests are veterans – On any given night in America, about 39,000 veterans are homeless. As reported in our latest survey, 16% of soup kitchen guests are U.S. veterans and 40% have reported being homeless.

More Senior Citizens are hungry – A recent city wide survey showed 16.1% more seniors reported being food insecure last year than in previous years, and our latest survey results show that more than 12% of our guests are over the age of 65.

You don’t have to be homeless to be hungry – for many low-income families, difficult choices have to be made: the choice to buy food or pay rent, to buy food or to buy a winter coat for a child. For many soup kitchen guests, being able to come here for a meal allows them—and their families—to remain in their homes.

Sources:
Hunger Free America
Coalition for the Homeless
Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen 2017 annual survey